Around Campus

Design Studio Workshop

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Design Studio was one of the new course offerings this year, and the one-week workshop proved to be a great success. Taught by Asher Dunn, a furniture and lighting designer based in Providence, RI, the course focused on the critical first steps for designing furniture for production, as well as the importance of research and market awareness.

Rather than pushing to create a finished piece, students developed many iterations of a single design, both on paper and though model-making. By bringing in a dynamic new instructor and stimulating conversation about the relationship between woodworking and industrial design, this production-centric course was a fantastic compliment to the other, more traditional woodworking courses taking place on campus.

Finishing Workshop

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In my experience, woodworkers tend to have a host of mixed feelings about finishing, apathy rarely being one of them. The right finish, applied in the right way, can transform a nice piece of furniture into one that sparkles with polished beauty. On the other hand, the wrong finish can create undesirable color, texture, sheen, and more, potentially detracting from even the finest craftsmanship. Harnessing the potential of the endless spectrum of finishes is an overwhelming task which one could pursue for a lifetime. Luckily for students at the Center, we have an expert in our midst. Teri Masaschi is a professional finisher and restorer from New Mexico, with extensive experience teaching techniques ranging from traditional hand-applied finishes to cutting-edge spray technology.

Bow Making Workshop

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Former studio fellow Brian Persico taught a two-week bow making course here at the Center, and it was a smash hit. After making their own bows, from spliting a log to weaving their bow strings, the students put their craftsmanship to the test with some target shooting.

The Studio Fellowship

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The Studio Fellowship is a unique program that gives emerging and established woodworkers the chance to advance their work within the supportive community of the school. Fellows are often graduates of the Center's Twelve-week and Nine-month courses, and visiting instructors frequently extend their time before or after their classes in order to participate in the program, as well. Fellows are integral to the vitality of the school, by helping maintain the facilities and volunteering at events, as well as contributing a dynamic creative energy. 

Student work in the Messler Gallery

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 Each year, as the Nine-month Comprehensive starts to wrap-up, the Current Student Work show in the Messler Gallery always astounds and inspires. The level of skill and creativity that the students achieve is simply overwhelming. As you can see, this year is no exception:

And the snow continues...

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Another blog post about snow? Isn't this supposed to be a blog about a woodworking school, ergo a blog about woodworking? Well, yes. But the Center is located in midcoast Maine, and Maine is a place so saturated in its own singular identity that everyone and everything within its borders marinates in Mainelyness until his, her, or its very core is so inextricably tied to Maine, that to reside elsewhere would mean to exist as someone or something else entirely. Thus, this blog is about Maine as much as it is about wood.

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