The Woodschool Blog

Precision with Hand Tools with Garrett Hack

Written by Michaela Stone on .

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One of our popular summer workshops is the Precision with Hand Tools course taught by Garrett Hack. Through making a small end table, students gain a deep understanding of how to use and fine-tune hand tools for precise, high-quality work. Working efficiently with hand tools instead of machines requires patience and hard work, but can also be a far more pleasant experience for a woodworker, and it imbues a piece with the subtle nuance of the hand of the maker. I'm always impressed by how much students in this class learn and create in just one week.

Current Work in the Studio Fellowship

Written by Michaela Stone on .

 

 

 

Incredible things are happening in the Studio Fellowship building these days. The creativity, skill, and work ethic of the five fellows is unparalleled, and they raise the energy level throughout campus with their inspiring work. While their personalities meld together harmoniously, the work they produce has impressive range. From sleek utilitarian functionality, to sculptural studies in form, to conceptual explorations, this group of woodworkers is a fantastic example of how boundless the future of furniture design will be.

2015 Open House

Written by Michaela Stone on .

 

At this year's Annual Open House, as guests started to arrive, the walkway became speckled with a polka dot pattern of raindrops. Up above, a single ominous cloud hovered in what was otherwise a bright and sunny sky. Just when the frustrating thought of moving everything inside crept into the minds of the staff, the cloud floated away just as inconspicuously as it had approached. It was a huge relief; although, to be fair, rain hasn't stopped us from having a blast before.

Each year at the end of June members of our local community are invited to our biggest party. With food and drink in hand, guests perused the New Work by Faculty exhibit in the Messler Gallery, as well as the many works in progress by current students and studio fellows throughout campus.

Progress in the Twelve-week Turning course

Written by Michaela Stone on .

The Twelve-week Turning Intensive students have been putting a myriad of techniques to work, producing stacks of bowls, spindles, carvings, vessels, and sculptures. Now entering the tenth week, individual styles and creative voices are beginning to emerge. Last week, industrial designer Dino Sanchez worked with the students individually to discuss the importance of marketing and product development. Dino quickly distinguished himself as an asset to the course by helping students recognize what makes their work uniquely special.

Winter Potluck

Written by Michaela Stone on .

The Twelve-week Turning Intensive students recently learned to turn bowls using wet wood. Unlike kiln dried wood, which produces flaky chips when turned, wet wood releases long, aromatic ribbons as it's cut into. With turning instructor Beth Ireland around, wet bowl turning means one thing: time to fire up the smoker. The bowl shavings are perfect for smoking meat, and from what I can tell, Beth's meat-smoking skill rivals that of her turning. She and her students invited the rest of campus over to the turning studio to indulge. The impromptu potluck was exactly what we all needed to get our minds off the cold - but beautiful - winter.

Beautility at the Messler Gallery

Written by Michaela Stone on .

Beauty + Utility = BEAUTILITY

The current show at the Messler Gallery is unlike any previous show at the school. "Beautility" is a collection of non-furniture objects, made at least in part with wood, that exemplify both pragmatic utilitarianism and aesthetic flair. For the full description of the show, click here.

The Fall Twelve-week Comes to an End

Written by Michaela Stone on .

During the final week of the fall Twelve-week Furniture Intensive, the students worked with focused determination, attempting to finish their pieces before showing them off to the rest of campus on their last day. Although there were some taped-on doors, some missing feet, and some strategically placed clamps still holding things together, the work was nonetheless impressive. This group of students had a special energy and camaraderie. Their playful enthusiasm emanated through their designs, which highlighted their unique personalities as individuals, but also their harmony as a group.

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